Author: Sara Altman

September 26, 2016 Sara Altman No comments exist

 

160311_pol_hillary-trump-jpg-crop-cq5dam_web_1280_1280_jpeg

WHEN AND WHERE IS THE DEBATE?

Clinton, a Democrat, and Trump, a Republican, will face each other at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y. The debate is scheduled to start at 8 p.m. Central Time.

WHICH TV CHANNELS WILL CARRY IT?

The debate will broadcast live on every network and cable news network: ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, CNN, C-SPAN, PBS, and MSNBC. New Orleans NBC affiliate WDSU, however, will be carrying the Saints-Falcons game.

HOW CAN I WATCH ONLINE?

Facebook will cooperate with ABC, and Twitter will partner with Bloomberg Media, to live-stream the debate.

August 8, 2016 Sara Altman 1 comment

 

school supplies

WHO? M.W. Joshua Grand Lodge of AR A.F. & A. M. Inc. and Naomi Grand Chapter

WHAT? Annual School Supply Give-Away

WHEN? Saturday, August 13, 2016 9am – 2pm

WHERE? Benny Craig Park

Children 15 and under must be accompanied by an adult

********* Free Supplies, Hot Dogs and Games for the Kids*********

 

IMG_0507

WHO? Legal Aid of Arkansas, Inc.

WHAT? 6th Annual Back 2 School Bash

WHEN? August 9, 2012, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Or UNTIL ALL SUPPLIES ARE GONE!

WHERE? Palestine-Wheatley Elementary School, Palestine, AR 72372

Look for the Legal Aid of Arkansas, Inc. sign out front.

PLEASE BE ADVISED
In order to receive school supplies, an adult must be present with children. Supplies will not be given for children that are not present in order to remain fair to the ones who are.

Read more about the 6th Annual Back-2-School Bash here.

For more information or to make donations, please call:

  • Katheenya Willis (870) 338-9834, x1301 or
  • Lindsay Kuehn at (870) 338-9834, x1303

 

August 5, 2016 Sara Altman No comments exist

dbanner

David Banner has been speaking out about current issues that has been affecting the black community. Banner is now coming to Pine Bluff Arkansas to UAPB to speak some more. According to UAPB News, Grammy Award winning music producer, recording artist, philanthropist, civic activist and actor David Banner will speak on August 25 during Welcome Week at the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff. The free, public event will begin at 6:00 p.m. in the H.O. Clemmons arena of the Kenneth L. Johnson, Sr. HPER Complex.

Banner will speak about his career in the music business, as well as his upbringing and what led him to create his foundation and company.

Contact the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership at (870) 575-7060 for more information on the event.

Read the full article here at UAPB NEWS

May 2, 2016 Sara Altman No comments exist


If Tuesday’s crucial Indiana primary serves to propel Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump toward their parties’ nominations, it will help pave the way not merely for a general-election matchup, but also an extreme study in contrasts.

The very attributes where Mrs. Clinton is strongest with voters—being knowledgeable, experienced and having the right temperament to be a good president—also happen to be areas where voters harbor some of their biggest doubts about Mr. Trump. And the attributes where Mr. Trump gets strong mark from voters—an ability to bring change to the country and being honest and straightforward—happen to be areas where Mrs. Clinton is weakest.

In short, these candidates aren’t just different; they are opposites. She’s the competent veteran who isn’t quite trusted, he’s the brash newcomer who is a bit scary.

Much has been made of the fact that both would carry exceptionally high negative ratings into a general-election matchup, and that’s certainly true. In the latest Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll, 56% of those surveyed reported negative feelings about Mrs. Clinton, and 65% had negative feelings about Mr. Trump.

Those are historically high numbers, and may set the stage for an exceptionally ugly fall campaign. Mr. Trump’s problems are particularly acute with groups Democrats are counting on for victory in the fall: 75% of voters aged 18 through 34 have negative feelings about him, and a stunning 79% of Latinos do. That tells you something about where the Clinton camp would aim a lot of its efforts in a general-election matchup.

Yet those overall numbers mask some striking contrasts in voters’ appraisals of the strengths and weaknesses of these two candidates. Each is seen as flawed, but the reasons could hardly be more different.

In that most recent Journal/NBC News national poll, Americans were asked to offer their appraisals of both Mrs. Clinton and Mr. Trump on a variety of attributes. Mrs. Clinton scored well for her knowledge and experience, for her temperament, and for her ability to handle an international crisis. On what might be considered softer attributes—being easygoing and likable, having the ability to bring change to the country and being honest and straightforward—she was weaker.

Mr. Trump was the mirror image. He scored well for an ability to get things done, bring change to the country and for being honest and straightforward. The deepest doubts have to do with his temperament, his knowledge and experience and his ability to handle an international crisis.

The public’s wildly opposing views of the candidates carry into specific demographic groups. The groups that harbor the most negative feelings about Mr. Trump—Latinos, political moderates, suburban women and whites with a college education—also give Mrs. Clinton the most positive ratings. He, by contrast, does better among older voters, men and working-class whites.

Perhaps the most stunning finding in the Journal/NBC News survey is that just over a quarter of voters hold negative views of both of them. These folks see the same shortcomings that everybody else does, just more so and in equal measure on both sides. They have deep doubts about Mr. Trump’s temperament, and deep doubts about Mrs. Clinton’s honesty. Political moderates, in particular, tend to be down on both candidates.

Interestingly, the doubts tend to have less to do with their positions on the issues than their personal attributes. On both the positive and negative sides of the ledger, positions appear to matter less than personal characteristics right now.

Mr. Trump’s biggest problem is that the doubts and negative feelings about him slop over into some core GOP voting groups, imperiling his ability to keep them in the fold.

The survey asked voters how they would vote in a matchup between a generic Republican and a generic Democrat, as well as how they would vote if Mr. Trump were matched up against Mrs. Clinton. He does slightly better than a generic Republican would among white men without a college education, for instance, but actually does slightly worse among other categories of white voters than would a generic Republican.

Mrs. Clinton’s challenge is being seen as authentic in a year in which both Mr. Trump and Democrat Bernie Sanders have illustrated that authenticity is an enormous asset. They run campaigns that often have had a seat-of-the-pants feel about them, but this year that sense may trump, so to speak, a sense of tight control.

People already are inclined to think Mrs. Clinton knows how to work the levers of power in Washington. The question is whether she can, at the same time, loosen up and convey a bit of that Trump-like and Sanders-like authenticity.

Write to Gerald F. Seib at jerry.seib@wsj.com

Source can be found here

August 6, 2015 Sara Altman No comments exist

Fox News has announced the line-up for the prime-time Republican presidential debate this Thursday, and here’s who qualified:

Real estate magnate Donald Trump; former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush; Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker; former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee; retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson; Texas Sen. Ted Cruz; Florida Sen. Marco Rubio; Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul; New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie; and Ohio Gov. John Kasich.

debate chat repdebatecandid

The roster of 10 candidates was determined based on an average of the five most recent national polls, according to Fox News. Trump as expected made the cut, securing the top slot. We are not surprised his attacks on others have put him in the spotlight. Right behind him were Bush and Walker, who each have posted strong numbers as well in recent surveys.

debate chat

These candidates are going to be looked at as the top ten among the presidential race. The debate will be aired on Fox News and we encourage you to check it out! Want to be a part of what’s going on? Below is a schedule of how you can interact with the debate tonight: Entire Fox News article here.

Schedule:

5 p.m. ET: Bill Hemmer and Martha MacCallum kick off the Fox News-Facebook Debate Event Night on Fox News Channel with the first Republican presidential primary debate.  Join Fox News personalities for a live chat onfacebook.com/foxnews.

6 p.m. ET: Watch the Fox News Facebook: Digital Chat as Harris Faulkner, Andrea Tantaros, Kennedy, Jesse Watters, and Tom Shillue discuss the first debate along with Todd Starnes on FoxNews.com and the Fox News Mobile apps.

9-11 p.m. ET: Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly and Chris Wallace moderate the prime-time Republican presidential primary debate. Plus, join the conversation on Facebook with Harris Faulkner, Andrea Tantaros, Kennedy, Jesse Watters and Tom Shillue.

11 p.m. ET: Tune in for a special “Kelly File” show following the debate.

11 p.m. ET: Watch the Fox News Facebook: Digital Chat as Harris Faulkner, Andrea Tantaros, Kennedy, Jesse Watters, and Tom Shillue discuss the Primetime debate along with Todd Starnes on FoxNews.com and the Fox News Mobile apps.

12 a.m. ET: Don’t miss a special debate night “Hannity” show.

Where to Watch/Weigh In:

• Tune in to Fox News Channel for live debate coverage, analysis and more, starting at 5 p.m. ET.
• Download the Fox News Election HQ 2016 App to score candidates during the debates and to interact with Fox News personalities on social media in real-time. Plus, the app will keep users up-to-date with all the action on the 2016 presidential campaign trail.
iTunes: http://apple.co/1SQUN64
Android: http://bit.ly/1OTjyhP
• Watch debate night coverage all night long live from your desktop, tablet and smart phone at FoxNewsGo.com.
• Join the live chat during the debates on facebook.com/foxnews.
• Follow along on FoxNews.com.
• Get in on the debate on the Fox News Facebook page. Submit your comments, pictures and videos here.
• Keep up with the best debate moments as they happen and weigh in using#GOPDebate on Twitter.

 

Read more at Fox News

July 17, 2015 Sara Altman 1 comment

hate

Many believe that the shooting in South Carolina was a hate crime, but the state can’t pursue any hate crimes charges because South Carolina does not have any hate crime laws. To my amazement I read an article on localmemphis.com who says that there are five states that “don’t have any legislation protecting its residents from hate crimes.” Arkansas is named as one of those states. Even though Arkansas, when faced with a hate crime, relies on federal law there is no current state law in place. In addition to South Carolina and Arkansas, Georgia, Michigan and Wyoming are the remaining states without a hate crime law. “The reality is, it’s gonna take a significant change for us to be able to pass some of that legislation,” said Rep. Fred Love. The question may arise, why are there no laws or bills in legislation? Arkansas has been focusing on civil rights laws. Love says, while needed, the civil rights laws are a backdoor approach to the legislation of hate crime laws. He says even that wasn’t easy. Why do our representatives have to “sneak” or use a backdoor approach to hate crime laws. It is obvious that they are needed, yet they have not been introduced as a bill.

To read the entire article from localmemphis.com Click Here

Photo credit:

Are Hate Crimes Worse than Other Crimes?